Recordings Capture Brutal FBI Tactics to Recruit a Potential Informant


A bailiff pushed Jabar Ali Refaie’s wheelchair into a federal courtroom in Tampa, Florida, on September 20. Dressed in an orange jumpsuit and looking weak from not having had the drugs he takes to treat his multiple sclerosis, the 37-year-old Refaie was here for a bond hearing after being indicted on felony charges that allege he sold counterfeit BMW logos and diagnostic software on eBay.

Source: Recordings Capture Brutal FBI Tactics to Recruit a Potential Informant

The FBI Is Building A National Watchlist That Gives Companies Real Time Updates on Employees


Will the FBI’s Rap Back service notify your boss that you got arrested protesting the inauguration?

Source: The FBI Is Building A National Watchlist That Gives Companies Real Time Updates on Employees

FBI Says It Has 487 Pages Of James Comey Talking Points, Refuses To Release Any Of Them | Techdirt


“Talking points” aren’t deliberative documents, interagency memos, or documents containing sensitive personal information [b(5), b(6)]. Neither are they documents that might expose law enforcement sources or investigative techniques [b7(D) and 7(E)].They are exactly what the name says they are: points to be used when discussing these issues in Congressional hearings or during press conferences. They are indicative of the public stances the FBI takes on certain issues. There’s nothing secret about them, or at least there shouldn’t be.

Source: FBI Says It Has 487 Pages Of James Comey Talking Points, Refuses To Release Any Of Them | Techdirt

Top FBI Lawyer Argues Against Requiring Warrant for Data That Tracks People’s Location


IF LAW ENFORCEMENT was forced to get a warrant to obtain information about a suspect’s whereabouts from the phone providers, it would be “crippling,” according to James Baker, general counsel at the FBI.“I don’t know how we would handle that,” said Baker, speaking on a panel at the American Bar Association’s annual conference on national security law in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. The executive branch would suffer from “a huge amount of uncertainty and confusion while we are doing investigations.”

Source: Top FBI Lawyer Argues Against Requiring Warrant for Data That Tracks People’s Location

Unsealed Warrant Shows FBI Malware Affected Innocent Tor Users While Agency Ran More Than 20 Child Porn Sites | Techdirt

In 2013, the FBI received permission to hack over 300 specific users of dark web email service TorMail. But now, after the warrants and their applications have finally been unsealed, experts say the agency illegally went further, and hacked perfectly legitimate users of the privacy-focused service.“That is, while the warrant authorized hacking with a scalpel, the FBI delivered their malware to TorMail users with a grenade,” Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), told Motherboard in an email.

Source: Unsealed Warrant Shows FBI Malware Affected Innocent Tor Users While Agency Ran More Than 20 Child Porn Sites | Techdirt

Amid Clinton Controversy, FBI Documents Show Why Americans Should Worry About Intelligence Gathering


Critics are right to be concerned about the FBI’s expanded power, especially when it comes to recruiting and deploying informants. That’s true regardless of why FBI Director James Comey acted as he did toward Hillary Clinton.

Source: Amid Clinton Controversy, FBI Documents Show Why Americans Should Worry About Intelligence Gathering

America has one month to stop the FBI getting its global license to hack • The Register


In one month, an obscure procedural rule tweak will come into effect allowing US cops and federal agents to hack any computer in the world using a single warrant issued anywhere in America.

No one in Congress has voted on this legal update. It means a warrant granted somewhere within the US can be executed on the other side of the country – or the other side of the planet.

The change, approved by the Supreme Court, is in Rule 41 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure. Right now, if law enforcement wants to hack a PC, they have to ask a judge for a warrant in the jurisdiction where it is located. With the rule change, they could do this to any computer anywhere in the US or the world.

As a bonus, the change would also allow law enforcement – without a warrant – free rein to hack into computers that have already been hacked. So, for example, if you have a virus infection then law enforcement can go through your files at will.

Source: America has one month to stop the FBI getting its global license to hack • The Register

In the Chicago Police Department, If the Bosses Say It Didn’t Happen, It Didn’t Happen

It’s really sick how some persons of authority can misuse public trust for personal gain, and how many of their colleagues help them hide it


Two young officers began to hear rumors of a drug gang operating within the Chicago Police Department. They were skeptical at first.

Source: In the Chicago Police Department, If the Bosses Say It Didn’t Happen, It Didn’t Happen

Yahoo’s CISO resigned in 2015 over secret e-mail search tool ordered by feds | Ars Technica


Reuters: Yahoo “complied with a classified US government directive.”

Presuming that the report is correct, it would represent essentially the digital equivalent of a general warrant—which is forbidden by the Fourth Amendment

Source: Yahoo’s CISO resigned in 2015 over secret e-mail search tool ordered by feds | Ars Technica