Justice Department’s Demand for Extreme Secrecy in Reality Winner Trial Contested by Defense


Reality Winner’s defense lawyers accused the government of attempting to unfairly gag them from discussing issues vital to the case and the public at large.

Source: Justice Department’s Demand for Extreme Secrecy in Reality Winner Trial Contested by Defense

US renews fight for the right to seize content from the world’s servers | Ars Technica


No access to world’s servers thwarts “criminal and national security investigations.”

Source: US renews fight for the right to seize content from the world’s servers | Ars Technica

Justice department ‘uses aged computer system to frustrate Foia requests’ | Politics | The Guardian


Lawsuit accuses DoJ of ‘failure by design’ through decades-old system and refusal to use new $425m software on freedom of information requests

Source: Justice department ‘uses aged computer system to frustrate Foia requests’ | Politics | The Guardian

Eric Holder’s Longtime Excuse for Not Prosecuting Banks Just Crashed and Burned


New evidence supports critique that Holder, for a combination of political, self-serving, and craven reasons, held his department back from prosecuting big banks.

Source: Eric Holder’s Longtime Excuse for Not Prosecuting Banks Just Crashed and Burned

Leak Reveals Secret FBI Guidelines That Basically Give Them Free Rein To Spy On Journalists And Sources | Techdirt


This is the fox watching the henhouse. These are not restrictions, these are just the DOJ getting to ask itself if it really wants to spy on these journalists, and the DOJ telling itself “sure, go ahead.” There’s a further exception that if someone is a member of the media, but the FBI “suspects” they’re an intelligence officer or affiliated with a foreign intelligence service, “no additional approval requirements” are needed. So, as with the Rosen case, the FBI can just declare him a “co-conspirator” and voila, no approval necessary.

Source: Leak Reveals Secret FBI Guidelines That Basically Give Them Free Rein To Spy On Journalists And Sources | Techdirt

DOJ Warns Calexico Police: Fix Institutional Problems Before Adopting Surveillance Tech | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Maybe the US government should take it’s own advice and follow it

Law enforcement agencies should not expand their electronic surveillance capabilities until they have addressed core problems of corruption, incompetence, poor oversight, and inadequate training. Echoing concerns long raised by EFF, that’s the message the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) sent the Calexico Police Department (CPD) following a years-long investigation into alleged corruption by officers.

Source: DOJ Warns Calexico Police: Fix Institutional Problems Before Adopting Surveillance Tech | Electronic Frontier Foundation

David Patraeus, Who Leaked Classified Info To His Mistress, Says Snowden Should Be Prosecuted | Techdirt

Not all leaks are alike, nor are their makers. Gen. David Petraeus, for instance, provided his illicit lover and favorable biographer information so secret it defied classification, including the names of covert operatives and the president’s private thoughts on matters of strategic concern. Petraeus was not charged with a felony, as the Justice Department had initially recommended, but was instead permitted to plead guilty to a misdemeanor. Had an enlisted soldier of modest rank pulled out a stack of highly classified notebooks and handed them to his girlfriend to secure so much as a smile, he’d be looking at many decades in prison, not a pile of character references from a Who’s Who of the Deep State.

Source: David Patraeus, Who Leaked Classified Info To His Mistress, Says Snowden Should Be Prosecuted | Techdirt

Oregon DOJ Encourages Surveillance Of First Amendment Activities; Acts Surprised When Agents Do Exactly That | Techdirt

According to documents released to the ACLU, the Oregon DOJ has problems complying with both state and federal laws. Law enforcement agencies are forbidden from conducting surveillance of First Amendment-protected activities unless they can demonstrate beforehand that there is evidence of criminal activity tied to it. But the DOJ’s own presentations suggest agents should perform surveillance first and fix it in post. According to its instructions, agents should be “creative” when looking for justification for surveillance of First Amendment-protected activities. Literally, “any crime will do.”

Source: Oregon DOJ Encourages Surveillance Of First Amendment Activities; Acts Surprised When Agents Do Exactly That | Techdirt

Rep. Issa Calls Out Civil Asset Forfeiture As Letting ‘Cops Go Treasure Hunting’ | Techdirt

Civil asset forfeiture allows police to seize property as long as they believe that the assets in question were somehow connected to criminal activity. “As long as they believe” — that’s the key part. Authorities don’t have to actually prove the person was guilty of a crime. They don’t have to even file charges. The presumption of innocence is thrown to the wayside. It’s an egregious violation of the 4th Amendment, but that’s not even the most glaring problem with the system. Under current law, most states allow police departments to absorb up to 100% of the value of the confiscated property — whether it’s cash, cars, houses or guns — and use the proceeds to pad their budgets. It’s an obvious conflict of interest — and boy, is it profitable for law enforcement agencies.

Source: Rep. Issa Calls Out Civil Asset Forfeiture As Letting ‘Cops Go Treasure Hunting’ | Techdirt