Disney’s Decision Not To Renew SecuROM License Bricks ‘Tron: Evolution’ | Techdirt

Back in 2010, Disney released the game Tron: Evolution. The game was laced with SecuROM and suffered many of the same problems as previously described. As an example of how you don’t really own what you buy anymore, the game simply bricked when Disney decided not to renew its SaaS subscription for SecuROM software.

Source: Disney’s Decision Not To Renew SecuROM License Bricks ‘Tron: Evolution’ | Techdirt

Irony Alert: Disney (Yes, DISNEY!) Whines About ‘Overzealous Copyright Holders’ | Techdirt


Disney has now been put in the possibly awkward position of complaining about “overzealous copyright holders,” and talking about the importance of user rights and fair use to protect free speech and the First Amendment. No, really.Disney, of course, owns ABC. Back in May (though the complaint appears to incorrectly state March), ABC aired a two-hour program entitled The Last Days of Michael Jackson. The Michael Jackson Estate was not pleased and sued for copyright infringement. The complaint itself is quite a read.

Source: Irony Alert: Disney (Yes, DISNEY!) Whines About ‘Overzealous Copyright Holders’ | Techdirt

Michael Jackson Estate Turns The ‘Fair Use’ Tables on Disney – TorrentFreak


The Michael Jackson Estate is suing the Walt Disney Company and ABC for using dozens of its copyrighted works without permission. According to Disney, no harm has been done, since including these works in “The Last Days of Michael Jackson” documentary is “fair use.” The Estate clearly disagrees and notes that Disney’s argument would make even the founders of Napster pause.

Source: Michael Jackson Estate Turns The ‘Fair Use’ Tables on Disney – TorrentFreak

Traditional oil paintings of Star Wars Lightsabers by Drew Baker — Kickstarter

So this guy is going to make copies of intellectual properties belonging to Lucasarts/Disney for profit, and doesn’t expect any problems with that…

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/drewbaker/traditional-oil-paintings-of-star-wars-lightsabers

LA Times: You can’t read our Thor review because Disney is mad | Ars Technica


Studios commonly offer movie reviewers advance screenings of their movies so they have time to write their reviews (Ars included) before the movies become available to the general public. The Los Angeles Times is the paper of record for the Los Angeles metro area, so you’d expect its writers to have easy access to these movie screenings. But in a Friday tweetstorm, LA Times writer Glenn Whipp said that Disney had banned the paper from screenings of movies like Thor: Ragnarok in retaliation for its critical coverage of Disney’s relationship with the city of Anaheim, home of Disneyland.

Source: LA Times: You can’t read our Thor review because Disney is mad | Ars Technica

Disney CEO asks employees to chip in to pay copyright lobbyists | Ars Technica


Letter boasts of beating Aereo, getting TPP—and wants workers’ help in 2016.

Source: Disney CEO asks employees to chip in to pay copyright lobbyists | Ars Technica

Ex-Disney IT workers sue after being asked to train their own H-1B replacements | Ars Technica


Anger at Disney over last year’s hiring of foreign IT workers won’t relent.

Source: Ex-Disney IT workers sue after being asked to train their own H-1B replacements | Ars Technica

Disney drops—then doubles down on—DMCA claim over Star Wars figure pic | Ars Technica


Man who took photos of a $6.94 Walmart action figure gets banned from Facebook.

Source: Disney drops—then doubles down on—DMCA claim over Star Wars figure pic | Ars Technica

Lucasfilm Uses DMCA to Kill Star Wars Toy Picture – TorrentFreak


Star Wars: The Force Awakens has gone into an early and bizarre anti-piracy overdrive. Earlier this week a fansite posted an image of a ‘Rey’ action figure legally bought in Walmart but it was taken down by Facebook and Twitter following a DMCA notice. Meanwhile, webhosts are facing threats of legal action.

Source: Lucasfilm Uses DMCA to Kill Star Wars Toy Picture – TorrentFreak

‘How Movie Studios Exploit Video on Demand Services’

The best way for Hollywood to defeat piracy is by making content available, legally. To further this effort dozens of video on demand services have been launched throughout the world. However, not all of these services are happy with how the major studios treat them, and today we hear why.

The account below comes from an employee of a mid-sized video on demand (VOD) service in Europe.

To avoid repercussions from the major studios the author prefers to remain anonymous

Link (TorrentFreak)