In the Chicago Police Department, If the Bosses Say It Didn’t Happen, It Didn’t Happen

It’s really sick how some persons of authority can misuse public trust for personal gain, and how many of their colleagues help them hide it


Two young officers began to hear rumors of a drug gang operating within the Chicago Police Department. They were skeptical at first.

Source: In the Chicago Police Department, If the Bosses Say It Didn’t Happen, It Didn’t Happen

After key donations, GOP tried to keep poisoned kids from suing lead makers | Ars Technica


Leaked documents reveal how $750,000 in donations led to laws in Wisconsin.

Source: After key donations, GOP tried to keep poisoned kids from suing lead makers | Ars Technica

Supreme Court Eliminates Political Corruption! (By Defining It Out of Existence)


Unlike the rest of us, the Supreme Court thinks there are too many restrictions on money in politics, not too few.

Source: Supreme Court Eliminates Political Corruption! (By Defining It Out of Existence)

Florida Attorney General Endorses Trump After Taking His Money and Backing Off Trump University Investigation


Pam Bondi’s bigger favor to Trump may have been her 2013 decision not to investigate Trump’s for-profit education chain after he made a big donation to her re-election campaign.

Source: Florida Attorney General Endorses Trump After Taking His Money and Backing Off Trump University Investigation

AT&T gave $62K to lawmakers months before vote to limit muni broadband | Ars Technica


Missouri bill would make it difficult for cities to offer Internet service.

Source: AT&T gave $62K to lawmakers months before vote to limit muni broadband | Ars Technica

Just Before Passing Surveillance Expansion, Lawmakers Partied With Pro-CISA Lobbyists


The night before Congress passed legislation to expand surveillance power, legislators attended a party with the chief lobbyists for the bill.

Source: Just Before Passing Surveillance Expansion, Lawmakers Partied With Pro-CISA Lobbyists

“They Pray to the Money”; House Republicans Decry Speaker John Boehner’s Lobbyist-Friendly Congress

“He’s not a policy leader. He’s a political leader. He knows how to raise money,” Rep. Walter Jones, R-N.C., told North Carolina radio host Tyler Cralle. “We have allowed the money to control policy in Washington, D.C.”

Source: “They Pray to the Money”; House Republicans Decry Speaker John Boehner’s Lobbyist-Friendly Congress

Donald Trump Says He Can Buy Politicians, None of His Rivals Disagree


Trump was illustrating the key problem with the current campaign finance system: It has essentially legalized bribery.

Source: Donald Trump Says He Can Buy Politicians, None of His Rivals Disagree

Congress Tells Court It Can’t Be Investigated for Insider Trading

In a little-noticed brief filed last summer, lawyers for the House of Representatives claimed that an SEC investigation of congressional insider trading should be blocked on principle, because lawmakers and their staff are constitutionally protected from such inquiries given the nature of their work.

The legal team led by Kerry W. Kircher, who was appointed House General Counsel by Speaker John Boehner in 2011, claimed that the insider trading probe violated the separation of powers between the legislative and executive branch.

In 2012, members of Congress patted themselves on the back for passing the STOCK Act, a bill meant to curb insider trading for lawmakers and their staff. “We all know that Washington is broken and today members of both parties took a big step forward to fix it,” said Rep. Bill Johnson, R-Ohio, upon passage of the law.

But as the Securities and Exchange Commission made news with the first major investigation of political insider trading, Congress moved to block the inquiry.

Link (The Intercept)

New Anti-Corruption Social Network In Russia Requires Numerous Personal Details To Join: What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

As the murder of the opposition politician Boris Nemtsov last week reminds us, the political situation in Russia is not just difficult, but extremely dangerous. Presumably hoping that technology might offer a relative safe way to cope with this situation, a Russian NGO has announced that it will be launching a nationwide social network dedicated to fighting bribery and corruption. You might expect that anonymity would be a crucial aspect, given the risks faced by those who choose to join. And yet, as this RT article explains, that’s not the case (via @prfnv):

the new project will have one major difference from existing social networks — a complete lack of anonymity. Membership will only be granted by invitation from existing members, and even when this condition is met, the institute that launches the project promises to open accounts only after verifying the identity of potential members in real life.

The users will have to provide a lot of details about themselves — from name and date of birth, to place of work, e-mail and phone numbers. The people launching the project say that this is a necessary measure to prevent attempted slander, which they see as the main danger threatening their network.

Link (Techdirt)