FanX, Previously Salt Lake Comic Con, Ordered To Pay $4 Million For San Diego’s Con’s Attorney’s Fees, Barred From Calling Itself A Comic-Con | Techdirt

It’s the trademark story that simply won’t go away and in which the legal system appears to get everything wrong. The saga of the San Diego Comic-Con’s legal adventures against what was formerly the Salt Lake Comic Con (now rebranded as FanX Salt Lake Comic Convention) has been brutally frustrating. The whole thing started when the SDCC decided somewhat out of the blue to begin enforcing a trademark it had been granted for “Comic-Con” against the Utah production. The trademark original sin of this story began all the way back with the USPTO, which absurdly granted the SDCC its trademark for a purely descriptive term, one which is only unrecognizable as such due to the shortening of the second word from “convention” to “con.” Despite that, the trademark suit brought against the Salt Lake Comic Con somehow ended in a win by jury for the SDCC, which was awarded only $20k. In the trial, SLCC had pointed out several times that the term “comic-con” was both descriptive in nature and clearly had been abandoned by SDCC, evidenced by the long list of other comic conventions going by the term carried out throughout the country.

Source: FanX, Previously Salt Lake Comic Con, Ordered To Pay $4 Million For San Diego’s Con’s Attorney’s Fees, Barred From Calling Itself A Comic-Con | Techdirt

Baltimore’s Endless Pursuit of Keith Davis Jr.

In a case of mistaken identity, Baltimore police fired 44 shots at Keith Davis Jr., hitting him three times. He now faces his fourth trial for murder.

Source: Baltimore’s Endless Pursuit of Keith Davis Jr.

That Was Quick: Thomas Goolnik Already Gets Google To Forget Our Latest Story About Thomas Goolnik Getting Google To Forget Stories About Thomas Goolnik | Techdirt

We have had the same here at IgnorantAndUnreasonable

Dear Google RTBF reviewer (who I’m sure will be reading this soon): Under the terms of the GDPR, you are only supposed to agree to a content removal if what we are publishing is “personal data” that is no longer necessary, and (importantly, please read this, guys) that is not “for exercising the right of freedom of expression and information” or “for archiving purposes in the public interest, scientific or historical research purposes….” This post, like the last few, are news stories that are in the public interest, specifically about how someone is abusing the GDPR’s “right to erasure” process to delete news reports about his abuse of the GDPR “right to erasure” process. This story is not about anything earlier that Thomas Goolnik may or may not have done. It is about what he did within the last few days. It is not old. It is not no longer relevant. It is directly relevant, and this post should not be subject to any GDPR right to erasure claims.Dear Thomas Goolnik: Seriously dude? How much longer is this going to go on? It is legal for a news report to mention your name. We’re not even talking about the original think you want forgotten. We’re talking about what you’ve been up to the past few years trying to get everyone to forget the thing you want forgotten. Maybe let it go.

Source: That Was Quick: Thomas Goolnik Already Gets Google To Forget Our Latest Story About Thomas Goolnik Getting Google To Forget Stories About Thomas Goolnik | Techdirt

Fuck You, Pepsi, and Your Sky-Advertising Satellite Plans

If you’re like most people, at some point in your life you’ve lain on your back on the grass at night, and gazed up into the inky, never-ending blackness of the night sky, and marveled at all the stars. While you were losing yourself in vertiginous gazing, I’m sure you were probably thinking “Damn! I sure wish someone was trying to get me to buy something right now!” Well, my good friends with benefits (we’ll talk), I’m pleased to tell you that you’re in luck, because a Russian company called StartRocket has teamed up with PepsiCo to use satellites to display advertising in the night sky. Finally, right?

Source: Fuck You, Pepsi, and Your Sky-Advertising Satellite Plans

Starz, meet the Streisand Effect. Cable telly giant apologizes for demented DMCA Twitter takedown spree • The Register

Inadvertently highlights easy abuse of IP protection

Source: Starz, meet the Streisand Effect. Cable telly giant apologizes for demented DMCA Twitter takedown spree • The Register

Tesla Pressured Doctors to Block Workers Comp Benefits to Save Money: Report

Imagine getting shocked at work by an industrial electric current so severely that you fall backwards, urinate on yourself, and have pain, numbness, and balance problems. Third-party doctors subsequently confirm, yep, you were electrocuted. But then a manager from your employer steps in and says, no it was just minor static electric shock, like the kind you get when you touch a doorknob after walking on the rug, just so the company isn’t on the hook for the associated medical costs with your treatment and doesn’t have to report the workplace injury to regulators. That’s what apparently happened at Tesla’s Fremont factory, according to a new report from Reveal from the Center of Investigative Reporting.

Source: Tesla Pressured Doctors to Block Workers Comp Benefits to Save Money: Report

EU Tells Internet Archive That Much Of Its Site Is ‘Terrorist Content’ | Techdirt

In the past week, the Internet Archive has received a series of email notices from Europol’s European Union Internet Referral Unit (EU IRU) falsely identifying hundreds of URLs on archive.org as “terrorist propaganda”. At least one of these mistaken URLs was also identified as terrorist content in a separate take down notice from the French government’s L’Office Central de Lutte contre la Criminalité liée aux Technologies de l’Information et de la Communication (OCLCTIC)

And just in case you think that maybe the requests are somehow legit, they are so obviously bogus that anyone with a browser would know they are bogus. Included in the list of takedown demands are a bunch of the Archive’s “collection pages” including the entire Project Gutenberg page of public domain texts, it’s collection of over 15 million freely downloadable texts, the famed Prelinger Archive of public domain films and the Archive’s massive Grateful Dead collection. Oh yeah, also a page of CSPAN recordings. So much terrorist content!

Source: EU Tells Internet Archive That Much Of Its Site Is ‘Terrorist Content’ | Techdirt

Congress is about to ban the government from offering free online tax filing | Ars Technica

Just in time for Tax Day, the for-profit tax preparation industry is about to realize one of its long-sought goals. Congressional Democrats and Republicans are moving to permanently bar the IRS from creating a free electronic tax filing system.Last week, the House Ways and Means Committee, led by Rep. Richard Neal (D-Mass.), passed the Taxpayer First Act, a wide-ranging bill making several administrative changes to the IRS that is sponsored by Reps. John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Mike Kelly (R-Pa).In one of its provisions, the bill makes it illegal for the IRS to create its own online system of tax filing. Companies like Intuit, the maker of TurboTax, and H&R Block have lobbied for years to block the IRS from creating such a system. If the tax agency created its own program, which would be similar to programs other developed countries have, it would threaten the industry’s profits.

Source: Congress is about to ban the government from offering free online tax filing | Ars Technica

FDA slams homeopaths for uncontrolled snake venom, germs in kids’ products | Ars Technica


In an ongoing crackdown on dubious homeopathic products, the US Food and Drug Administration posted warning letters on Monday to four homeopathic companies the agency said committed violations that put consumers at risk, including lacking quality controls for products containing snake venom as well as skipping safety testing for products intended for children.

Source: FDA slams homeopaths for uncontrolled snake venom, germs in kids’ products | Ars Technica